Journal of
Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics
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ISSN: 1690-4524 (Online)


Peer Reviewed Journal via three different mandatory reviewing processes, since 2006, and, from September 2020, a fourth mandatory peer-editing has been added.

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Published by
The International Institute of Informatics and Cybernetics


Re-Published in
Academia.edu
(A Community of about 40.000.000 Academics)


Honorary Editorial Advisory Board's Chair
William Lesso (1931-2015)

Editor-in-Chief
Nagib C. Callaos


Sponsored by
The International Institute of
Informatics and Systemics

www.iiis.org
 

Editorial Advisory Board

Quality Assurance

Editors

Journal's Reviewers
Call for Special Articles
 

Description and Aims

Submission of Articles

Areas and Subareas

Information to Contributors

Editorial Peer Review Methodology

Integrating Reviewing Processes


Education 5.0: Using the Design Thinking Process – An Interdisciplinary View
Birgit Oberer, Alptekin Erkollar
(pages: 1-17)

Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Smart Cities
Mohammad Ilyas
(pages: 18-39)

A Multi-Disciplinary Cybernetic Approach to Pedagogic Excellence
Russell Jay Hendel
(pages: 40-63)

Data Management Sharing Plan: Fostering Effective Trans-Disciplinary Communication in Collaborative Research
Cristo Ernesto Yáñez León, James Lipuma
(pages: 64-79)

From Disunity to Synergy: Transdisciplinarity in HR Trends
Olga Bernikova, Daria Frolova
(pages: 80-92)

The Impact of Artificial Intelligence on the Future Business World
Hebah Y. AlQato
(pages: 93-104)

Wi-Fi and the Wisdom Exchange: The Role of Lived Experience in the Age of AI
Teresa H. Langness
(pages: 105-113)

Older Adult Online Learning during COVID-19 in Taiwan: Based on Teachers' Perspective
Ya-Hui Lee, Yi-Fen Wang, Hsien-Ta Cha
(pages: 114-129)

Data Visualization of Budgeting Assumptions: An Illustrative Case of Trans-disciplinary Applied Knowledge
Carol E. Cuthbert, Noel J. Pearse, Karen Bradshaw
(pages: 130-149)

The Importance of Defining Cybersecurity from a Transdisciplinary Approach
Bilquis Ferdousi
(pages: 150-164)

ChatGPT, Metaverses and the Future of Transdisciplinary Communication
Jasmin (Bey) Cowin
(pages: 165-178)

Trans-Disciplinary Communication for Policy Making: A Reflective Activity Study
Cristo Leon
(pages: 179-192)

Trans-Disciplinary Communication in Collaborative Co-Design for Knowledge Sharing
James Lipuma, Cristo Leon
(pages: 193-210)

Digital Games in Education: An Interdisciplinary View
Birgit Oberer, Alptekin Erkollar
(pages: 211-230)

Disciplinary Inbreeding or Disciplinary Integration?
Nagib Callaos
(pages: 231-281)


 

Abstracts

 


ABSTRACT


A Discrete, Deterministic Model for Understanding Software Project Development Contingency Profiles

Bruce R. Barkstrom, Paula L. Sidell


This paper describes a simple, discrete deterministic model for the allocation of project contingency as a function of project phase. When a project starts, there is always some uncertainty regarding the resources it will require. As the project proceeds, the participants discover this uncertainty and remove it through the expenditure of resources. In addition, the project may encounter unexpected changes in its environment that force the project to change. The model assumes that the project will eventually discover a (relatively small) number of contingencies, each of which requires the same workforce and duration to resolve. Because the time of appearance and resolution time for each contingency is independent of other contingencies, there may be several overlapping contingencies the project will work on at the same time. Because the model assumes that contingencies suddenly add and subtract staff, managing staff becomes much more complex than is the case with a more uniform staffing plan. In particular, if there are appreciable hiring and firing costs, a project may find it desirable to simply retain staff that can be assigned to contingencies, even though there may be periods with no contingency work.

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